The Paradox of Eating Horse Meat

Horse MeatWell, as usual, the morning news was a complete critical thinking mystery for me. Headlines today were all about the growing European horse meat scandal. Stories went into great detail about how trace amounts of horse meat have been found in Eurpean beef and about how great it is that DNA technology can now be used to determine if trace amounts of horse meat is contaminating beef supplies. They warned of impending beef price increases as all beef will now certainly have to be screened for trace amounts of horse meat before Americans can eat it.

In addition to trying to figure out why we need beef from Europe in the first place, and wondering if we still make glue out of horses, the part that struck me as mysterious is why we should care that our cow-based pink slime contains trace amounts of horse-based slime. Americans in this country mindlessly scarf down and often throw in the garbage millions and millions of cows, pigs, chickens, sheep, deer, turkeys and just about anything else that walks, flies or swims on earth and that can be captured killed for food. People eat horse regularly across the world and I bet we have been eating it here too whether we know it or not. It is common, plentiful, and relatively nutritious as far as meat goes. No part of the press coverage discussed the practice of eating horse meat from a logical standpoint. It was just assumed that the entire American public audience has already determined that eating horse meat was morally reprehensible. Is it? If so why?

Why exactly does the mere possibility of trace amounts of horse meat in imported Swedish meatballs create public outrage worthy of the top placement in national news for Americans? I have spent quite a bit of time contemplating this and I have yet to come up with one critical thinking justification. Is it because some people keep horses as pets? I guess that could be it, but not all that many people today keep horses as pets. People also keep pigs, sheep, rabbits and even deer as pets. Just about any animal can be domesticated but that does not create any sort of issue for most Americans eaters. Pigs are the perfect example. They actually have been bred so that the wild characteristics are completely absent in the animals we eat. In the right environment, they would actually make great family pets.  They are extremely smart (smarter than dogs or horses), loyal, and they are capable of complex emotions such as grief, sadness, fear, aguish and terror. They are also capable of bonding with a human being exactly the way dogs and horses do.horsemeat2

Why are we not outraged that millions of pigs have been found in our supply of pork?  Why is a horse considered sacred and a pig is considered a food staple of the proudly unconscious and unhealthy American diet?

I read an article and the author sums this paradox up pretty well in my opinion.

We continually draw distinctions between what’s dinner and what’s trash, who our pets are and who our meals are. We live with cats and dogs we smother with love and affection, yet other animals live miserable lives and endure horrific deaths because we’ve decided their lives are only worth the price of a fast food meal. But if we then accidentally eat a part of the animal we’re not accustomed to, it’s the end of the world.

 

Part of the success of fast food companies lies, of course, in exactly that: distancing ourselves as much as possible from what we’re eating. If we knew the sickening conditions animals in factory farms are subjected to (or, for that matter, the slavery-like work conditions forced on human beings who pick the under-ripe tomatoes and grow the iceberg lettuce for fast food hamburgers), we wouldn’t be able to sleep at night. I guess it’s true, as Paul McCartney once said, “if slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be a vegetarian.”

 

The fast food system – cheap food prepared quickly, eaten quickly, forgotten quickly – hinges on one slim peg: wilful ignorance. When incidences like this crop up, they slam right into what we don’t want to know. So we get outraged. But obviously the real scandal is that we’re allowing ourselves to fall for this great lie in the first place: that what we eat doesn’t matter, that it arrived in our hands magically, and that there are no consequences to our diets.

So how do we make the distinction with the horse? Considering how many other choices we have for eating, does the mere thought of consuming the tortured flesh of such a beautiful, majestic, and noble creature simply disgust you to the point that eating it would not be a choice even if it were the most delicious meat you have ever tasted and even if everyone else around you thought it was perfectly acceptable?

If so, congratulations on your first steps down the path of becoming a conscious eater. Now, expand your new style of thinking and start to actually listen to your logical brain instead of listening to fixed self-serving, logic-less, ideology that was planted in your brain the first day you mindlessly devoured a plate of bacon. Is it really that hard? From a logical standpoint, is that pulled pork sandwich any different than a pulled horse sandwich?

As a person that no longer eats mammals or foul of any type, people often ask me how I am able to resist a delicious steak or a good burger after years of consuming and enjoying them regularly. For me the answer is exactly the same way that the American public can now instantly refuse a perfectly good piece of horse after they have been consuming and enjoying it regularly for years. It is simply a matter of conscious versus unconscious decision making.

Just because the unconscious mind creates habits that are hard to break, make no mistake, the conscious mind can easily regain control if allowed! I know for me personally conscious eating was a spring board toward a new level of awareness that is still growing within. I became aware of decisions that I previously did not even know I had and more are revealed every day. Conscious eating is not a matter of mind-over-matter or extraordinary will-power. It is just deciding that horse meat is wrong to eat and then not eating it.  How hard is that?

When the conscience is the guide, there is really no need for dieting, will power, or DNA testing of meatballs that we ship from overseas to line our big box retail stores and arteries. We can just go to a farmer’s market instead! Best of all, if you get freaked out by all of the people swarming around you in the farmer’s market it is a hell of a lot easier to get out than when you are at IKEA!