My Personal Experience Healing Back Pain

I am sure my legions of readers have wondered what happened to the critical thinker blog. I have not posted to this blog since September 2013, when we narrowly averted war with Syria.  I would bet Google Analytics is wondering what happened to the 15 hits every month or so that this site typically commands.

Have I run out of hypocrisy to rant about? Did I delete my Facebook account? Did I experience a massive head injury and then subsequently join the Tea Party? Have I given up on my war on fear? Has fixed ideology won out over critical thinking? Make no mistake, I have not run out of things to write about, just time.

Writing a blog about fear and hypocrisy is a good way to help a person deal with their own.  Dealing with your own fear and hypocrisy is a good way to sell your house and a majority of your possessions. Selling your house and a majority of your possessions is a good way to find yourself living in a van down by the river; a prospect I have contemplated a couple of times in this blog. Well, long story short my wife and I did, sort of, decide to buy a van and live down by the river, and like I figured, we are pretty damn lucky and happy about the decision.

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What is Wrong With Public Education in America – Part II

I wrote my last blog about ideology and misconception and aimed my sites at the general public that is dramatically uninformed and ignorant about actual issues that our grossly underpaid and underappreciated professional educators face. I guess it is good that I buttered them up because for this blog, it is with some trepidation that I am going to turn the table and point the finger at the teachers themselves.

I previously wrote a blog criticizing the medical community for taking pretty much zero responsibility for their own societal wellness failures. I pointed out that in my field of electrical engineering I really don’t get the option of throwing my hands in the air and saying, “sure, that airplane system doesn’t work, but I tried. The task was just too hard and your airplane wiring was pretty screwed up to start with.” I actually think I tried that one a time or two and you can imagine about how well that went over with my customer. As laughable as that sounds coming from an avionics electrical engineer, that is pretty much the exact thing I see and hear from multitudes of teachers and professional educators all over social media and on the conference calls with schools that I find myself one desk over from while my wife coaches and patiently teaches.

I recently read a published letter entitled “Teachers aren’t the school problem.” It is written by a graduating high school senior that has a pretty strong but obviously fixed belief system and he describes why he would not go into the field of education. He goes on to state:

“I feel if a teacher presents the information in an effective way and thoroughly explains the information, they have done their jobs. It is now the student’s responsibility to receive the information. If a student still does not understand a concept, it is the student’s responsibility to set up an arrangement for further explanation. What is school without work? There should be an equal amount of effort.”

I guess I am not surprised to see that a teenager has such an ideological and simplistic view about the role of educators, but what surprised me is the amount of attention and accolades that this article has gotten from the teaching community. If you are a teacher and you believe that whether or not a student “receives the information” is completely outside of your job description, then you are certainly in the wrong field. I think we already have enough D’Marqus Jamal Forbes’s in education and enough limiting beliefs. I personally am pretty comfortable that young Mr. Forbes has chosen another line of work. It takes a lot more to be a successful teacher than a strong interest in the subject matter and a desire to help kids. You need to actually like kids too.

I can just imagine if I took that approach with my dogs. Hey, I delivered all of the information, but ultimately my dog just didn’t choose to receive the information. Not my fault, and after all, I really don’t like dogs that much anyway. Good thing there is a shelter nearby that will take him so that I can buy another dog and try again.

No one is successful 100% of the time at anything, but you will not be successful even 1% of the time if you start with an expectation of failure or apathy. This is just one of those great little nuances that make the journey of life interesting and difficult. If only we spent a little more time hammering this fundamental principle home to our kids instead of hammering home the ability to do long division by hand then I think we would have a very different crop of graduating students each year, and a different world in general.  Unfortunately, limiting beliefs with an expectation of failure and blame of others is a rampant problem in education and the world. Regrettably, I also find myself in this trap far too often.

How do we stay focused on what is best for the kids? If there is one term/question that has been drilled into my brain from listening to my wife work over the years this would be it.  I have said before that my wife is the best educator I have ever known or seen in action and I believe that her fundamental core belief system is what sets her apart. She is not the most polished public speaker, and she is not the most well read or highly educated University fact-filled, elitist. She is also not the most entertaining carnival act although I have heard her use her love of puns to regale more than a few stuffy rooms full of high school math and science teachers.

What my wife does have more naturally than anyone I have known, is an unwavering belief in the inherent potential of every single person that she has ever worked with from the neediest kindergartener to the crustiest, old school superintendent.  She has never met a bad kid, and never encountered a single child (or person for that matter) that isn’t worthy of at least her belief that they can change and learn. This is as solidly a part of her belief system as her belief that gravity will hold her to the earth when she steps out of bed and it is definitely no act she is putting on.  I know this feeling well because it is exactly the same feeling I have about every dog I have ever met or worked with in my life. Sorry humans, I am still trying to catch up to my wife’s level of enlightenment, but I am just not there yet. I have seen her put on an act to satisfy a job requirement and I have seen her teach/coach. The difference is strikingly obvious just like when I try to pull that dog and pony show stuff while training my dog Rufus.

However, if that student/client shows my wife even a glimmer of a belief that they might also share her opinion about their own potential ability to learn and change, then they are off on a journey with her that seems a lot more like what I think teaching should be than the fixed instruction that I received for most of my educational career.  If however, she enters a room and finds “limiting beliefs” lingering like a cloud of smoke over all, then she instinctively locks on to that sense of pessimism like a cheetah locking on to the jugular of a gazelle. Usually, good things happen educationally as a result, regardless of what is being taught or my wife’s own personal expertise in the subject matter. I think the difference between an educator/coach and a subject matter expert is a distinction that not too many people in our country realize although I sure wish they could. It is kind of like the difference between a wellness coach and a medical doctor. We need them both, but they are just not the same job, regardless how many people believe they are, or how many people believe that one has extreme value over the other. In my opinion, human medical doctors and educational subject matter experts are sort of a dying breed with a limited future in our society. At least that is with respect to dealing with patients/kids.

With advancements in technology including things like Webmd and the unthinkable amount of “subject matter” that is at the fingertips of pretty much everyone today and everywhere we go, why do you really need to drive in a car, sit in a room and wait for someone to tell you what the bump on your leg is when you can probably just figure out what it is and what to do about by using the internet.  Sure today, there is some risk involved, but I have news for you, there is also some risk associated with believing your human doctor’s assessment and treatment plan. And besides, just because there is risk associated with that type of self-diagnosis today, I bet there won’t be in the future. A simple scanner will tell you exactly what that bump is with a great degree of accuracy right in your own home. Doctors can go where they belong, behind a door and working on science and making money, not trying to connect with an actual human being. Similarly, I am not sure I see the value of driving a bunch of kids to a building every day so that someone can tell them that Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States. By the way, I should probably have known that Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States by memory, right? I am sure I have been thoroughly educated and tested on this subject matter during my primary educational career, correct? Well, guess what, I didn’t remember, but it took me about 2.5 seconds to figure it out using only one of the three computers sitting in front of me right now.

If you are laughing at the number of spelling errors or grammar errors in my blogs, well you have absolutely no idea what my blog looks like before I run the computer spell check. You would probably think I was a third grader although I was pretty much a straight A student in Spelling and Grammar in school. At this point I am just waiting for spell check to get better, and to be honest, sometimes I am just lazy. Go ahead and give me bad grade and smirk.

How about the four semesters of Calculus I endured as the building block of my electrical engineering career? Today, I could not pass a single calculus test that I have ever taken including a high school calculus test. Maybe other engineers have very different jobs than I do but I sure don’t see how studying that subject to that degree was necessarily critical for the vast majority of us engineering undergrads. For whatever reason, education seems stuck in a world that does not have computers and technology. Instead we say that spending hours and hours learning mathematical computation is teaching fundamentals. To some extent I see the value but the balance between theoretical and practical is way off in all levels of our education system and I believe this is a huge setback to the advancement of civilization. What we have is a population of students that know very well that Albert Einstein was a physicist who was responsible for the theory of relativity. They can also complete a few simple math computations using E=mc2. But unfortunately, at the end of the day, neither the student or even the teacher in a lot of cases have much of an actual concept about what the theory of relativity really is, or how it affects our entire perspective of reality, let alone the mathematics behind it.

What we need to be doing instead is specializing more based on interests and talents instead of using a generic education system to figure out who is mentally strong enough to store the most amount of information that they have no interest in pursuing other than because they were told they have to get a good job. Enough of my rant about school curriculum that probably should have been a separate blog, back to the point of this blog.

Coaching, on the other hand, is teaching a person how to unlock their own internal, self-guided, interest-driven potential, and the unbelievable power associated with belief in oneself and belief in one another. Unfortunately, we haven’t even scratched the surface of what could be achieved through the relatively new field of educational coaching or the power of positive thinking. If we could combine that with mindfulness training and teaching kids how to first and foremost learn to approach life with a calm, confident and stable mind there would be no limit to what these kids could achieve. Although coaching as a field or segment of education is relatively new, plenty of teachers like my wife have been using these techniques for decades.  Only back then it was just called being a good teacher. An awful lot of teachers now seem to take a far simpler view of their job by believing that whether or not a student decides to come to class or decides to apply themselves is not a part of their job or a reflection of their skills as a teacher. Maybe it’s not, but it sure should be.

Some would say that what I am talking about is the difference between an elementary educator and a high school or college educator. I disagree. Just the techniques differ. When I was in college, I had two types of professor. Professor A had absolutely no attendance policy and his lectures were packed every day. Professor B had a big policy requiring attendance and that was outlined in the class syllabus and strenuously highlighted on the day one introductions. I could tell within the first half hour of professor B’s first lecture why there was an attendance policy that was attached to my grade. I usually then spent the second half hour calculating exactly how many of professor B’s classes I could skip before dropping a letter grade.  Then I would get a head start on tackling the intriguing assignment that I just got from Professor A’s class even though it was not due for a week.

We can have debates about teaching techniques all day. I can see and understand legitimate arguments for tough love, and increasing standards and I can also see argument for my wife’s preferred method of coaching and making connections and gaining trust and trying to light a spark of interest from within. I think it depends on the student and teacher more than anything and adopting a one size fits all approach is a mistake, just like with dogs. Regardless, kids are a lot like dogs.  If you know me, you know I actually believe this is a compliment.

With dogs, one of the training challenges but one of their crucial instinctual developments and useful skills in working situations is that they don’t respond well to acting. You can do every single action, command, and training technique by the book but you will NEVER be successful until you, yourself become an unwavering believer in your dog’s ability to carry out your expectations. I believe I can speak for my wife by saying that kids and adults that you are teaching/coaching are no different.

Our fundamental belief is far more powerful than the actions of any individual or information they know. There have been many books written about this fairly well proven phenomenon, the Bible being the one that comes to mind first from someone of my background. A good number of people sure do interpret this book’s message differently than I do. Not the first or last thing in life like that for me.

My wife and I both cringe every time one of our educator friends posts a “look what my dumbass student said or did” status update on social media. I have even seen photos of dumb test answers complete with belittling comments written in red ink along with a poor circled letter grade for both the student and all of their hundreds of friends to see, laugh at, and comment on. But it is certainly not the teachers fault right? A teacher can’t make someone want to learn, can they? The truth is the good ones do every day. It is as if a lot of teachers actually like to brag on social media about how bad they are at their job and how funny it is that their students don’t respect them. Is that something to brag or laugh about if your actual job is the exact opposite? They then usually follow this up with a rant about how screwed up the system is because it is going to force them to pass this dumb kid on to the next grade even though they didn’t manage to teach them a thing or motivate them at all in the past year.

I think I would drop dead if I ever saw or heard my wife say that it is not her job to  try to convince a kid to turn her homework in on time or achieve according to his potential. Likewise, I am pretty sure my wife would drop dead if she ever found me posting a “look at what a crazy, dumbass my dog is” status update photo. It won’t happen because that is not part of our belief system and also because we realize that what we are experiencing is much more a reflection of us than our own dogs or students.  Not because our dogs don’t do some crazy dumb stuff and not because my wife has never had a completely ridiculous kid or teacher to deal with.  It is just that we both happen to have enough experience to know what works and what is a complete setback and obstacle in a world that is going to provide enough obstacles to last a lifetime without the teacher piling on.

I admit, I have a hard time criticizing the public school teachers of America even though they do at times make it hard not to. This is primarily because they have the very easy argument of saying “oh yeah? well, I would like to see you do my job.” I guess to that I would say, I am already aware that I am not near bright enough, talented enough, compassionate enough, or dedicated enough to tackle that job and that is why I went into electrical engineering. I am afraid there are probably a few too many teachers that, like me, aren’t really cut out for the job either. A lot of people think that you deal with this problem by busting unions and firing teachers that don’t stack up and by pushing kids toward private school options.  I would argue that there are a few logistical and equitability problems with this approach and I think I covered that pretty well in my last blog.

Although I fully admit that I don’t have what it takes to be a teacher, I certainly wish I did. My Mom is another lifelong educator that is talented, dedicated, and patient beyond anything that I can comprehend in my life so far.  Although she is not a University degreed teacher, she has worked in schools and with kids for decades as a multi-handicap aide, a teacher’s aide and as an elementary librarian. I have watched her my entire life as she makes friends with and ultimately positively influences the lives of a multitude of kids with all sorts of challenging backgrounds. Like with my wife, I have never once heard an inherently negative comment from her about one of her student friends. I simply cannot imagine her saying, “hey, I read that book perfectly to those kids. It’s not my fault that their parents let them watch TV so much that they can’t sit still or focus on reading.” She could have made more money doing something else or by getting a degree, but true to her fundamental belief, she has preferred to stay focused on the kids, and her family, and on enjoying her work instead of chasing dollar signs and then resenting it. Although I have witnessed it my entire life, these are virtues I have yet to achieve. Her talents and ability to connect with and make a difference in a child’s life make me feel very proud even though she is far too humble to toot her own horn or publicize her success. Her lifetime work and even the subtle impact that she makes every day is a far greater accomplishment than any degree, job title, or paycheck that I have ever received, thats’ for sure.

I can only imagine how it must feel to get the kinds of letters and feedback that my wife and mom get from now adults that credit them for forever changing the course of their lives by doing nothing else but believing in them, and listening to them, and by being their genuine friend and mentor, even when no one else would. They don’t write letters thanking them for teaching fractions or the Dewey decimal system, although no doubt they did that too. Unfortunately these types of rewards and accolades don’t come along with engineering jobs very often. Or, in my experience, at all. The fact that I yearn for these rewards is probably the exact reason they are so elusive to me. It is not really about that for my wife and mom.

As professional educators continue to be marginalized by the community and media and as teachers get further and further fed up with the bureaucracy that surrounds them,  I would bet that fewer and fewer of these types of letters are getting written every year. That is a shame for sure. What you are left with is class full of students staring at a clock and wishing they were just about anywhere else but in that classroom and a teacher that feels just about the same. I use to get that feeling in my gut quite a bit during my educational career. Just writing this will probably cause me to have one of those; I skipped a class and missed a final types of dreams. I just hope I am not in my underwear. Regardless, I can tell you first hand that not a lot of learning goes on in this environment of mutual misery and general disinterest between student and teacher.

Teachers of America, I realize your job sucks and that you are underpaid, overworked, and underappreciated, but really, the next time you have had it with your job, your boss, the board, smartass disrespectful arrogant kids or other challenges, try spending just a minute refocusing on “What is best for the kids”. Isn’t that why you got into teaching? I know you didn’t think you were going to get rich. While you are thinking, maybe also consider what an unbelievable opportunity you have to make a positive difference in the course of another human being’s life. Maybe also think about how you can be a coach and friend instead of just a subject matter expert and drill sergeant. Trust me, opportunities like that don’t come along for most of us very often as we sit inside of grey cubicles, staring at computers screens, filling out TPS reports and pondering the possibility that this is all there really is to life. If you can’t make a difference within the school or administration you are in, find one where you can, or start your own revolution of change. Or, you can just do like I did and take the lazy road of being a corporate slug and griping about what is wrong with the world in a blog. It is really your choice but the future of the entire world is in your hands and the pliable targets of opportunity are all around you. Just don’t act or go through the motions. That is a waste of everyone’s precious and all too short time.

The Paradox of Eating Horse Meat

Horse MeatWell, as usual, the morning news was a complete critical thinking mystery for me. Headlines today were all about the growing European horse meat scandal. Stories went into great detail about how trace amounts of horse meat have been found in Eurpean beef and about how great it is that DNA technology can now be used to determine if trace amounts of horse meat is contaminating beef supplies. They warned of impending beef price increases as all beef will now certainly have to be screened for trace amounts of horse meat before Americans can eat it.

In addition to trying to figure out why we need beef from Europe in the first place, and wondering if we still make glue out of horses, the part that struck me as mysterious is why we should care that our cow-based pink slime contains trace amounts of horse-based slime. Americans in this country mindlessly scarf down and often throw in the garbage millions and millions of cows, pigs, chickens, sheep, deer, turkeys and just about anything else that walks, flies or swims on earth and that can be captured killed for food. People eat horse regularly across the world and I bet we have been eating it here too whether we know it or not. It is common, plentiful, and relatively nutritious as far as meat goes. No part of the press coverage discussed the practice of eating horse meat from a logical standpoint. It was just assumed that the entire American public audience has already determined that eating horse meat was morally reprehensible. Is it? If so why?

Why exactly does the mere possibility of trace amounts of horse meat in imported Swedish meatballs create public outrage worthy of the top placement in national news for Americans? I have spent quite a bit of time contemplating this and I have yet to come up with one critical thinking justification. Is it because some people keep horses as pets? I guess that could be it, but not all that many people today keep horses as pets. People also keep pigs, sheep, rabbits and even deer as pets. Just about any animal can be domesticated but that does not create any sort of issue for most Americans eaters. Pigs are the perfect example. They actually have been bred so that the wild characteristics are completely absent in the animals we eat. In the right environment, they would actually make great family pets.  They are extremely smart (smarter than dogs or horses), loyal, and they are capable of complex emotions such as grief, sadness, fear, aguish and terror. They are also capable of bonding with a human being exactly the way dogs and horses do.horsemeat2

Why are we not outraged that millions of pigs have been found in our supply of pork?  Why is a horse considered sacred and a pig is considered a food staple of the proudly unconscious and unhealthy American diet?

I read an article and the author sums this paradox up pretty well in my opinion.

We continually draw distinctions between what’s dinner and what’s trash, who our pets are and who our meals are. We live with cats and dogs we smother with love and affection, yet other animals live miserable lives and endure horrific deaths because we’ve decided their lives are only worth the price of a fast food meal. But if we then accidentally eat a part of the animal we’re not accustomed to, it’s the end of the world.

 

Part of the success of fast food companies lies, of course, in exactly that: distancing ourselves as much as possible from what we’re eating. If we knew the sickening conditions animals in factory farms are subjected to (or, for that matter, the slavery-like work conditions forced on human beings who pick the under-ripe tomatoes and grow the iceberg lettuce for fast food hamburgers), we wouldn’t be able to sleep at night. I guess it’s true, as Paul McCartney once said, “if slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be a vegetarian.”

 

The fast food system – cheap food prepared quickly, eaten quickly, forgotten quickly – hinges on one slim peg: wilful ignorance. When incidences like this crop up, they slam right into what we don’t want to know. So we get outraged. But obviously the real scandal is that we’re allowing ourselves to fall for this great lie in the first place: that what we eat doesn’t matter, that it arrived in our hands magically, and that there are no consequences to our diets.

So how do we make the distinction with the horse? Considering how many other choices we have for eating, does the mere thought of consuming the tortured flesh of such a beautiful, majestic, and noble creature simply disgust you to the point that eating it would not be a choice even if it were the most delicious meat you have ever tasted and even if everyone else around you thought it was perfectly acceptable?

If so, congratulations on your first steps down the path of becoming a conscious eater. Now, expand your new style of thinking and start to actually listen to your logical brain instead of listening to fixed self-serving, logic-less, ideology that was planted in your brain the first day you mindlessly devoured a plate of bacon. Is it really that hard? From a logical standpoint, is that pulled pork sandwich any different than a pulled horse sandwich?

As a person that no longer eats mammals or foul of any type, people often ask me how I am able to resist a delicious steak or a good burger after years of consuming and enjoying them regularly. For me the answer is exactly the same way that the American public can now instantly refuse a perfectly good piece of horse after they have been consuming and enjoying it regularly for years. It is simply a matter of conscious versus unconscious decision making.

Just because the unconscious mind creates habits that are hard to break, make no mistake, the conscious mind can easily regain control if allowed! I know for me personally conscious eating was a spring board toward a new level of awareness that is still growing within. I became aware of decisions that I previously did not even know I had and more are revealed every day. Conscious eating is not a matter of mind-over-matter or extraordinary will-power. It is just deciding that horse meat is wrong to eat and then not eating it.  How hard is that?

When the conscience is the guide, there is really no need for dieting, will power, or DNA testing of meatballs that we ship from overseas to line our big box retail stores and arteries. We can just go to a farmer’s market instead! Best of all, if you get freaked out by all of the people swarming around you in the farmer’s market it is a hell of a lot easier to get out than when you are at IKEA!

It’s the end of America as we know it…And I feel fine! (Part Two)

I had a hard time coming up with the Title for yesterday’s blog right up until the REM song that came on Pandora, got me quickly to the “Publish” button in WordPress. Sometime later, as I thought about the title, and the song, I realized that I may have not written the correct blog for that title. Well, this is the correct blog.

Before I owned my own business I worked as a direct employee for a few different engineering companies. I was constantly frustrated with continual threat of impending layoffs, not enough work or too much work, and a steady diet of poor decisions by others that were affecting my own professional reputation and ability to do my job successfully.

One day, I distinctly remember stopping in at a bar after work with a colleague. We were surprised to find our department’s VP with another department’s VP at a table by the door as we walked in. My friend and I both looked at each other half hoping we did not get caught slipping out of work at 4:45pm and half wondering if the VP’s even had a clue who the two low level guys from sector 8 were. To my semi-surprise they did recognize us and even asked us to join them. We sat down, ordered a drink, and began to have an eye opening conversation with a couple of guys that probably were a drink or two beyond control of what they should have been saying, and to whom. As I polished off my first beer, I distinctly remember realizing that in addition to drinking the mug of beer, I had also just made more progress in 25 minutes toward advancement in my company than I had the entire four years busting my butt in that grey cubicle! I thought about how cool it was that with my new friends, I would finally get some recognition for what I have been doing all this time. By the end of the third beer I was starting to feel a little nauseous, but it wasn’t from the beer.  I was realizing what it really took to get ahead in “good old boys” world of corporate America. My friend decided to stay and have a fourth beer, but I decided instead to leave that bar… and quit my job. I did, and a decade later, that has been the best career decision, I ever made.

At first, things went very well. It was early in 2000 and the economy hadn’t started to tank. I had enough contacts in the industry and a good enough reputation that my phone immediately started ringing with offers from other companies to go work for them. I decided I could support them all instead of just one of them. And so just like that, my consulting business was off and running.  I incorporated a year or so later and started occasionally hiring subcontractors to complete larger projects as my small business grew along with my income.

I started off in my home with the plan of growing into a larger company with maybe a few employees or more. However, I soon realized that my talents and even interests were definitely not in running a large business or being a personnel manager. I prefer the engineering design tasks and not sitting around a conference table hammering out a budget. Anyway, I was clearing six figures and still got to sneak out for a weekday afternoon round of golf every now and then. I didn’t have to tell a sole or answer to anyone. Life and career were good!

Then, the housing bubble collapsed, the stock market crashed, and the recession ensued. I think everybody remembers well enough how that whole thing went down.  In fact, my company’s business reports pretty much follow the exact same lines I see on graphs of the economy overall during that time and really even today. Business hit a low point a few years ago. For the first time in my entire life, I had to sit down and make a decision about which of our bills I was going to skip payment on this month. I am sure I am not the only one reading this who knows how bad that sucks. Luckily, like I touched on before, we had good credit, so I transferred a couple of high rate cards to low intro APR card and we managed to weather the storm with only a few late fees, and no hit on our credit, barely.

Like for the country as a whole, the recovery for my business has been way too slow. Even today, although steadily employed and even though signs say things are improving, the hourly rate that I am able to command for my services is approximately 40% less than it was not long ago, as is my income. I guess I should be furious at Obama. The industry that I work in certainly is. There is no doubt that the world of corporate aviation has been turned upside down as have the lives of a heck of a lot of us that work in the industry. It certainly did not help when the entire group of bank CEO’s showed up at congress to beg for money each arriving in an individual private jet. They still got paid and Obama and the Democrats pounced. Just like that, the life of an average-Joe corporate jet engineer changed in a political instant.

I had to get creative, I shifted my business focus away from jets and picked up some work in the general aviation and helicopter markets although they pay quite a bit less. We also adjusted or budget. I brown bag it a little more often, we have kept the same vehicles, and old countertops, and unfortunately we have had to cut out a scuba diving vacation or two. I also often find that my mid-week round of golf is at the muni with a coupon if I can find one. Tough changes and cuts to make for sure, but to be honest even describing this makes me feel a bit uncomfortable and selfish.

Where Obama-care is the rallying cry for most, “User-Fees” are the rallying cry for the angry righties in my world.  You see, under Obama, the government proposed a $100 fee, per flight, for all corporate jets. Because, as we know, the government is broke, this was an effort to help offset the cost to airports, air traffic control, and the impact to the environment when you have a relative few people zooming circles around the rest of us packed liked sardines in a 747. Makes sense I think, but the CEO’s and giant companies don’t seem to be as comfortable sacrificing as my wife and I. As you can imagine, asking millionaires and billionaires to pay a little more has caused quite the commotion. So, just exactly like the healthcare industry that has been in trouble long before anyone signed Obama-care, User-Fees were the ammunition that my industry used to rally the foot soldiers into believing that Obama and his crippling new tax were going to shut down the entire industry. My email inbox and professional publications wanted to make it very clear that the slowdown of my industry has nothing to do with the economy, nothing to do with the wars, nothing to do with the stock market, and nothing to do with the incredibly deep recession the entire country found itself smack in the middle of. Nope, for us it was these $100 User-Fees. And every mechanic in my industry that got laid off became very familiar with the term as well as Obama’s part in it. Like Obama-care this hasn’t even gone in to effect but the shear threat of it was enough to feed the hungry fear monster. I guess I should be outraged as well right? Obama and these taxes are killing those that could be creating jobs for me. Nice try.

User-Fees, like Obama-care, have absolutely nothing to do with the overall issues we are facing. Once again, the numbers simply do not add up. These words are just the sword being used. You see, I am a critical thinker. I am not saying that a $100/flight user fee is not going to have some impact on the bottom line for more than a few companies. I am sure it will. Sorry if I don’t drop on my hands and knees and cry, “oh the humanity!”, but at the same time I am also certain that more and more private jets at major airports do affect the bottom line of the government run air traffic control system as well. Why shouldn’t they be asked to pay more tax as they ask more from the government? I guess maybe unlike others, I have also spent a bit too much time watching $15 million dollar business jets burn $100 worth of jet fuel just idling on the taxi-way while the mini-bar is restocked.

So I guess maybe this is why I am so sensitive about all of the whining and complaining I see on social media from people that have wealth many could only imagine.  My family has taken a pretty substantial hit in the income department in recent years. But for some reason, instead of crying about how my six figure income is no longer even close to six figures, I decided instead to write a series of blogs about just how damn lucky I really am to have any figures at all, and I meant every word I wrote.

I probably am too harsh on my friends and the whiners in this country. Yes, it is frustrating when your work and the economy suffer, and yes, making sacrifices in life is not always easy. Neither is seeing your candidate loose. Trust me, I know very well what 2004 felt like.

I believe that a lot of what we are actually seeing is back lash from the fact that for the first time in the history of this country, white men are finding themselves not quite as high on the old totem poll as they once were. White men in the country have a pretty long history of getting what they want at any cost. Just ask the Native Americans. In recent years we have also not been asked to sacrifice nearly as much as minorities, women, and certainly not as much as the rest of the world as the economy dips around us. At least not the men of my generation. The voting numbers in the last two elections have pointed out a pretty interesting shift. I think way more than anything, the social media rhetoric, the all-out, full-force cries about the death of America, and the finger pointing actually point to one simple explanation. White men are losing their power in this country, and they are freaking out about it in one pretty furious, big baby fit.

I think everybody loves the idea of democracy. “One vote one person” is exactly how it should be, but for quite a few in this country, it seems the love affair with democracy may have hit a roadblock. The once almighty and all powerful are finding themselves a slight minority. What is best for the majority of the country, for the first time, may not be what is best for Mr. Pearly White. Previously, when a recession hit, or layoff numbers shot up, for the most part, Mr. White experienced only a minor inconvenience while others, with a little less collective power took it a little harder in the rear. Since, I am part of that new minority, I guess I should be upset or scared too. I am not. Like I said in my title, it is the end of America as we know it…and I do feel fine. You see, I have found that life does not work very well when I don’t feel fine and when I think in narrow self-focused terms. If my country or a majority of people in it are suffering, who am I to believe that I should not suffer along with her taking the lumps I have coming?

To be honest, I am not real certain what the next decade has in store for us and I would not be entirely surprised if things do get even worse. It certainly doesn’t help to shiver in fear, or cry about how unfair things are. Take a look around you. When has life ever been fair?

If ten years from now, my wife and I find ourselves living in a van, down by the river, I will feel fine then too. Instead of yelling out the window about how my situation is someone else’s fault, I will be writing a note about just how lucky I am to have that van, my wife, compassion, love, and my clear and present mind. I will mean every word I write, and on that day, as I am today, I will be the wealthiest man in the world.

It’s the End of America as We Know it…And I Feel Fine!

A day after the election, the doomsday nuts are out in full force, more than I would have even guessed. On Facebook today here are just a few of my personal favorites:

  1. “America will never be the same. We are so screwed”
  2. “I’m convinced that America as we’ve know her died tonight”
  3. “America is officially dead and will never be strong again.”
  4. “America died last night. And my grandchildren will never know how great we once were.”
  5. “Guess I better plan on going back to being an “employee” of someone rather than running my own business. Depressing!!”

The first four were cracking me up, but I think #5 is the most telling. Sure he was kidding but still, in response to about how business is today, the answer in another post was “Our business is fine and going strong.” As an entrepreneur that also has a business that has been “fine” and “going strong” under Obama’s first term, I think this perfectly highlights the unbelievable high level that the rhetoric has reached. Given the sheer numbers actually out of work and suffering in the recession, I simply cannot imagine being so crass. I think the biggest irony is that every one of those came from self-proclaimed Christians. What would Jesus think? I think he might tell them they are being a little self-absorbed and then leave to help the poor and to spread the message of love and compassion.

As usual, and I guess not surprising, is that Obama-care and welfare in general is still the resounding rallying cry of the right. I am always surprised that this bill has generated this amount of focus and public attention. Yes, you can debate the relative worth, but when you hear the rhetoric about how it will bankrupt the country, and end life as we know it, you have to scratch your head because the numbers simply do not add up. That is usually when I flip on Fox News and realize, oh, I forgot about them.

As a self-employed entrepreneur, I have been purchasing my own health insurance on the open market for the last 10 years or more.  The amount that I have paid monthly into the system over that time is tremendous. I went to the doctor one time a few years ago to have a boil lanced but I did not come close to exceeding my deductible for that year. I did get some form of health care from a guy that helped me devise an exercise program to help me with the genetic lower back disorder I inherited. None of that was covered by my insurance and I paid it all out of pocket. The surgery that I am working hard to try not have in the future will be covered 100% and I am sure they could happily be slicing and dicing me in under a week, no questions asked. I guess I should be happy that I am protected by the greatest health-care system in the World. My back is a little nervous about that though.

I also pay for a yearly blood test out of pocket and I am in perfect health, except for my back. I am meticulous about exercise, diet and wellness and my wife and I have both taken advantages of alternative care and wellness services so that we can stay as healthy as we can, as long as we can. Again, all out of pocket and not covered by insurance.

So, what I would like, is for someone to explain to me why exactly I should be outraged about Obama-care? When you consider just how much money I have forked out for health-care in the past ten years for medical care I did not receive, why exactly should I be more outraged about having to pay for a surgery to save the life of a poor lady that got hit by a car, than I am about having to pay for a surgery to make it physically impossible for a wealthy fat lady to eat five Whoppers? And when you consider that I already am paying for the care of the uninsured poor lady on the back end with my ever increasing insurance dollars, and that the lady, that was already too poor to buy insurance, is now going through an expensive public bankruptcy process, the outrage becomes even more of a critical thinking mystery. Unless I guess, you are hoping the uninsured just don’t bother going to the hospital to save themselves. In that case you are correct, the current system probably does save a few dollars. I guess that is better than socialism?

In a world where most people get their health insurance through their employer as a benefit, I think it is difficult for them to understand how much they each already are paying for socialized health-care for, pretty much every single citizen less the few that Obama-care picks up in an effort to curb the cost we already pay for the uninsured. If people had insurance expenses taken out of their paycheck like I do instead of off the top as a company “benefit”, I think the obvious path toward a public option would face little opposition.

Only in a public option framework can we then move toward a more reasonable and productive system where health-care providers are not compensated by the number of procedures or drugs they sell, but instead by the number of procedures or drugs they help their patients avoid. They wouldn’t be penalized for treating ill patients but there would be an incentive for patient wellness where there simply is not in the current system. And if as a patient in a public system, I have an option to meet wellness goals to lower my tax that might work well for me too. In fact, the incentive is actually the opposite for for-profit health-care providers. With a little new motivation, I have a strong feeling that quite a few health-care providers will start finding surprising new ways to motivate their patients, and quite a few of those “last resort” bariatric surgeries might not be needed; and neither will a good number of the dollars I currently spend paying for them. In a for-profit entrepreneurial reality, those bariatric surgeries are an absolute gold mine. That is just one example. Please feel free to do your own critical thinking on other scenarios.

Is this line of reasoning that difficult to accept on a critical thinking level? What exactly am I missing? And sorry, your answer cannot be “Obama-care is Socialism” or “Obama-care is killing America”, although I do realize that limits your options.